Tag Archives: Spring

Displaying GIT build number (hash) in your REST API

The product i’m working on currently (a PaaS cloud offering) had a requirement to provide an API resource (GET call) throughout which a user could obtain basic details about the actual version of the API exposed (the api version, build time, corresponding git repo build number (hash id) and the jvm version used to compile the API). Except for the git repo hash part, everything else seemed to be quite easy to obtain. Below you’ll find the solution (step-by-step guide) i came up with.

 

End result (goal):

> curl http://api.my-system.company.com/1.0/
{
  "Implementation-Build" : "2951e7e",
  "Implementation-Build-Time" : "2013/09/17 12:40:02 AM,UTC",
  "Implementation-Jdk" : "1.7.0_15",
  "Implementation-Version" : "1.0-SNAPSHOT",
  "Implementation-Vendor" : "My Company, Inc.",
  "Implementation-Title" : "My System"
}

 

Technologies used:

 

Steps required: 

1. First let’s add the <scm> configuration tag to your master pom.xml file. The connection string represents the repository for which the buildnumber-maven-plugin will obtain the git hash id.

<scm>
    <!-- Replace the connection below with your project connection -->
    <connection>scm:git:git://github.com/mariuszprzydatek/hyde-park.git</connection>
</scm>

 

2. configure the maven-war-plugin to generate project’s MANIFEST.MF file, where the git hash id will be stored. Also, the Spring MVC controller will read this file in order to return its content as a result of GET call.

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.3</version>
    <configuration>
        <archive>
            <addMavenDescriptor>false</addMavenDescriptor>
            <manifest>
                <addDefaultImplementationEntries>true</addDefaultImplementationEntries>
            </manifest>
        </archive>
        <warName>1.0</warName>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

 

3. In the <properties> section of the pom we can define the format for the date timestamp that will be returned as the value of “Implementation-Build-Time” attribute.

<properties>
    <maven.build.timestamp.format>yyyy/MM/dd hh:mm:ss a,z</maven.build.timestamp.format>
</properties>

 

4. Next, let’s add the remaining pom sections that we’ll be storing in the MANIFEST.MF file for further read:

    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <organization>
        <name>My Company, Inc.</name>
    </organization>
    <name>My System</name>

 

5. within the <archive> key of the maven-war-plugin <configuration> section, we need to add additional manifest entries including the one (<Implementation-Build>) that will be generated by the buildnumber-maven-plugin:

<archive>
    ...
    <manifestEntries>
        <Implementation-Build>${buildNumber}</Implementation-Build>
        <Implementation-Build-Time>${maven.build.timestamp}</Implementation-Build-Time>
    </manifestEntries>
</archive>

 

6. Add the buildnumber-maven-plugin itself which will do the hard work:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
    <artifactId>buildnumber-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.1</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <phase>validate</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>create</goal>
            </goals>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

 

7. Finally, add the <configuration> section to the buildnumber-maven-plugin together with the <shortRevisionLength> key that is responsible for the length of git hash id we want to export:

<configuration>
    <shortRevisionLength>7</shortRevisionLength>
</configuration>

 

 

Now, let’s create the Spring MVC controller that will be handling the MANIFEST.FM file read and returning its content to the presentation layer.

@Controller
@RequestMapping
public class ApiController {

    /**
     * Handling GET request to retrieve details from MANIFEST.MF file
     * @return implementation details
     */
    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.GET)
    public @ResponseBody Map<String, String> getBuildNumber(HttpServletRequest request) throws IOException {

        ServletContext context = request.getSession().getServletContext();
        InputStream manifestStream = context.getResourceAsStream("/META-INF/MANIFEST.MF");
        Manifest manifest = new Manifest(manifestStream);

        Map<String, String> response = new HashMap<>();
        response.put("Implementation-Vendor", manifest.getMainAttributes().getValue("Implementation-Vendor"));
        response.put("Implementation-Title", manifest.getMainAttributes().getValue("Implementation-Title"));
        response.put("Implementation-Version", manifest.getMainAttributes().getValue("Implementation-Version"));
        response.put("Implementation-Jdk", manifest.getMainAttributes().getValue("Build-Jdk"));
        response.put("Implementation-Build", manifest.getMainAttributes().getValue("Implementation-Build"));
        response.put("Implementation-Build-Time", manifest.getMainAttributes().getValue("Implementation-Build-Time"));

        return response;

    }

}

 

 

Hope you enjoyed this post.

Take care!

Spring REST API hardening – exceptions handling

For some time now there’s a lot of discussion over the internet on the definition of a unified RESTful API standard (architecture, design, interfaces, etc.). RFC’s are being discussed by IETF committees trying to come up with a standard, work continues on re-designing the HTTP protocol itself (HTTPbis, by the IETF HTTPbis WG chaired by Mark Nottingham), but what we have thus far are only good and bad practices…

 

What i’d like to address in this post are good practices related to exceptions handling in a Java Spring MVC based RESTful API application.

 

Let’s start with this: In order to make your REST API more developer-friendly, you may want your MVC controllers to return (within the body of the response), some information that can assist the client developer while using your API.

 

Using a JSON data format, a sample controller response in situation of an exception may look like this:

{
    "code" : "SAE00202",
    "status" : "SECURITY_AUTHORITY_ERROR",
    "errors" : [ "Security Exception: Insufficient Authorization Level. Access denied" ]
}

 

Here’s an example of how you can achieve that easily using Spring MVC’s @ControllerAdvice annotation (which indicates the annotated class assists a “Controller” and serves as a specialization of @Component annotation, allowing implementation classes to be auto-detected through classpath scanning).

@ControllerAdvice
public class BusinessExceptionHandler extends DefaultExceptionHandler {

    @ExceptionHandler(IncompleteUserProfileException.class)
    @ResponseStatus(value = HttpStatus.PRECONDITION_FAILED)
    @ResponseBody DefaultErrorMessage handleIncompleteUserProfileException(IncompleteUserProfileException e) {

        if(debug) logException(e);

        String error = getResourceBundle().getMessage("exception.user.profile.incomplete", null, Locale.getDefault());

        return new DefaultErrorMessage("RS00302", "BUSINESS_ERROR", error);

    }

}

 

Aside from the fact that you may want to write custom handlers like the one above for your application-specific exceptions (Business/Security/Validation related, etc.), you may also want to “go deeper” and extend the ResponseEntityExceptionHandler class (abstract), and override the default implementation of the exceptions below; thrown usually by MVC Controllers:

Spring MVC ResponseEntityExceptionHandler Exceptions

 

In order to do that, first you have to start with a simple POJO representing your default error message:

public class DefaultErrorMessage {
    private String code;
    private String status;
    private List errors = new ArrayList<>();

    public DefaultErrorMessage(String code, String status, String error) {
        this.code = code;
        this.status = status;
        this.errors.add(error);
    }

    public DefaultErrorMessage(String code, String status, List errors) {
        this.code = code;
        this.status = status;
        this.errors = errors;
    }

    // getters and setters omitted
}

 

Having this in place, a custom implementation of BindException may look like this:

@ControllerAdvice
public class CustomResponseEntityExceptionHandler extends ResponseEntityExceptionHandler {

    @Override
    protected ResponseEntity<Object> handleBindException(BindException ex, HttpHeaders headers, HttpStatus status, WebRequest request) {

        List<String> errors = new ArrayList<>(ex.getAllErrors().size());
        List<FieldError> fieldErrors = ex.getFieldErrors();
        StringBuilder sb;

        for (FieldError fieldError : fieldErrors) {
            sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.append("Field: ").append(fieldError.getField()).append(", ");
            sb.append("Value: ").append(fieldError.getRejectedValue()).append(", ");
            sb.append("Message: ").append(fieldError.getDefaultMessage());
            errors.add(sb.toString());
        }

        List<ObjectError> globalErrors = ex.getGlobalErrors();

        for (ObjectError objectError : globalErrors) {
            sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.append("Object: ").append(objectError.getObjectName()).append(", ");
            sb.append("Code: ").append(objectError.getCode()).append(", ");
            sb.append("Message: ").append(objectError.getDefaultMessage());
            errors.add(sb.toString());
        }

        DefaultErrorMessage errorMessage = new DefaultErrorMessage("RQ00051", "RQ_BODY_VALIDATION_ERROR", errors);
        return new ResponseEntity(errorMessage, headers, status);

    }

}

 

I think you see the direction it’s heading in…

 

Happy coding 🙂

Cheers!

 

 

Resources:

Spring Data Redis overview

If you are, like me, a great fan of the Spring Framework, you probably know already the Spring Data product and corresponding spring-data-redis module. If not, let me introduce this wonderful tool in this brief post.

 

Spring Data Redis offers the following features (copied from the product homepage):

  • Connection package as low-level abstraction across multiple Redis drivers/connectors (Jedis,  JRedisLettuceSRP and RJC)
  • Exception translation to Spring’s portable Data Access exception hierarchy for Redis driver exceptions
  • RedisTemplate that provides a high level abstraction for performing various redis operations, exception translation and serialization support
  • Pubsub support (such as a MessageListenerContainer for message-driven POJOs)
  • JDK, String, JSON and Spring Object/XML mapping serializers
  • JDK Collection implementations on top of Redis
  • Atomic counter support classes
  • Sorting and Pipelining functionality
  • Dedicated support for SORT, SORT/GET pattern and returned bulk values
  • Redis implementation for Spring 3.1 cache abstraction

 

As of the time of writing this post, the latest product release is labeled ‘1.0.6.RELEASE’, and available as a Maven dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.data</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-data-redis</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.6.RELEASE</version>
</dependency>

 

Using Spring Data Redis in your project is as easy as defining the above dependency in your master pom.xml file, and configuring the RedisTemplate bean in either xml context file (example below) or using Java configuration:

    <context:property-placeholder location="classpath:redis.properties"/>

    <bean id="connectionFactory"
          class="org.springframework.data.redis.connection.jedis.JedisConnectionFactory"
          p:hostName="${redis.host}"
          p:port="${redis.port}"
          p:password="${redis.pass}"
          p:usePool="${redis.pool}" />

    <bean id="stringRedisSerializer" class="org.springframework.data.redis.serializer.StringRedisSerializer" />

    <bean id="redisTemplate" class="org.springframework.data.redis.core.RedisTemplate"
          p:connectionFactory-ref="connectionFactory"
          p:defaultSerializer-ref="stringRedisSerializer" />

 

and the corresponding redis.config file:

# Redis settings
redis.host=localhost
redis.port=6379
redis.pass=
redis.pool=true

 

…in code you’re using the RedisTemplate like this:

@Autowired
private RedisTemplate redisTemplate;

    public void saveEmail(String email, long userId) {
        redisTemplate.opsForHash().put("emails", String.valueOf(userId), email);
    }

 

I did also i quick overview of the extend to which Redis native API commands, related to performing operations on 5 basic Redis data types, have been implemented in the product. Below you’ll find a short visual summary:

 

  • Strings

Spring Data Redis String

 

 

  • Lists

Spring Data Redis List

 

 

  • Sets

Spring Data Redis Set

 

 

  • Hashes

Spring Data Redis Hash

 

 

  • ZSets

Spring Data Redis ZSet

 

 

Cheers!

 

 

 

Resources: